TOK Connection CATCHUP (Apr 21-22,25-26)

Thursday April 21st – Is there an afterlife?

Knowledge of an afterlife can never be deduced in physical form because one cannot enter it without leaving their life. Nonetheless, an individual has their own judgement on whether or not life after death is real. Personally, I am on the tipping point of either opinion, because as much as I fear the unknowns that is afterlife, but I also wouldn’t want just my life to be my entirety especially if I don’t live as long as I expect too (knock on wood).

Friday April 22nd – Can you truly know someone?

When one is born, they are completely new, thus they come to create their own identity as they grow older. One cannot discover who they are without the help of an external environment. Also, one is prone to changing over time, so their identity is never concrete. One’s identity is the product of their personal experiences, which are never exactly the same between separate individuals. Although people can come to connect with each other, they can only do so to an extent. Even those who are intimate grow independently. So essentially, one can never truly know someone.

Monday April 25th – Can we really know whether our actions will have the consequences we expect them to have?

One’s conscience allows them to assess the consequences of their every action, but these consequences are only predictions of what could actually happen. The ability to know an action’s consequences also depends on the action itself. If it’s too spontaneous, for example, the outcomes are more uncertain. It also depends on how careful the person acting upon this is. A person can be either filled with anxiety or apathetic with impulsiveness when they do something. The undeniable aftermath of an action is therefore debatable.

Tuesday April 26th – How did the trip help your progress in the English program?

This trip to the Spoken Word Workshop at Harbourfront was a helpful learning experience. It was a great way to practice for our IOC/D. Although I didn’t recite my quickly-written poems (which I’m glad since I was sick), I still was able to share the spotlight with a group for the “Generation _” poems. I think with this workshop, I am one step closer to being ready for my commentary.

TOK Connection CATCHUP (Apr 21-22,25-26)

How can we know for certain the facts of a crime that has no witnesses?

In a realistic world, there are many criminal cases that are left unsolved. The verdict of these cases that were undecided by the involved investigators, police, experts become open for discussion to the public. A relevant example is the case of Elisa Lam. There are many conspiracies that were deduced to explain how she died. But as the only evidence of her prior to her death was security camera footage, there is no concrete fact to how she truly died. Was it a homicide? A suicide? There are cases that will forever be left to the unknown, so it is in the hands of the people to decide if a theory holds truth to the scene of a crime.

How can we know for certain the facts of a crime that has no witnesses?

Why do humans hesitate to act?

As a child, one inherits the morals of their parents, as the ability to reason is a human characteristic that is different in every individual. If a child does an action considered unethical, they are scolded or punished. This discipline conditions the child so that they think before they do. This explains why humans are hesitant to act, because there is a need to assess the consequences of an action, especially the fact that everyone has a different opinion. 

Why do humans hesitate to act?

How can we find truth in a world of ambiguity?

When one thinks of truth, one relates the word with reality, something we think we know for certain exists only in one way. Therefore, if something is perceived as untruthful, it should not exist in the realm we refer to as real. People tend to have confirmatory bias, in which they assure that others agree with their preconceived judgement as to hinder any other ambiguous consideration. If we lose this habit of inductive reasoning, truth would become elusive, as people would be open to more meanings of the same thing. But as most people are reluctant to deny volatile facts, the most agreed-upon evidence becomes acknowledged as true. So in conclusion, truth can only be found in the subjectivity of others’ notions.

How can we find truth in a world of ambiguity?